adrien-gromelle:

i-am-babulous:

ethevagabond:

ktshy:

adrien-gromelle:

I always had a thing for hand animated camera move and turn around…
I can’t tell exactly why…
probably cause it gives me the feeling I can manage everything and show exactly what I have in my head.
that can seems stupid but it makes me feel like, sculpting the animation more than drawing it.

DANG! Anyone know what these are from?

Credits Please cause these are awesome. 

Hey ethevagabond.  I tried, but unfortunately, I could only identify the first, MYOSIS.

Hi everyone… sorry to answer so late
the first is a shot I did in Myosis”(link)
the second was an ”exercice”(link) in 1st year at gobelins
the third is a shot I animated for the short ”Oni”(link) realized with friend as an FX exercise.
the last (it was the more painful to do) is a shot extracted from our opening for the Annecy animation Festival ”Hurley’s Irish”(link)

enjoy ;)

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fangirling-so-hard-rn:

GoT actors with GoT bobbleheads (x)

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jackiecello23:

But when I was doing the scene, [director] Alex Graves said “When you say that last line, ‘I can be your family,’ say it like ‘I love you.’” And that’s the take that they used. (x)

image

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archiemcphee:

As part of a tour put on by an organization called The Mystical Arts of Tibet, a group of Tibetan Buddhist monks from the Drepung Loseling Monastery in India recently visited the Crow Collection of Asian Art in Dallas, Texas. They were there for a weeklong residency during which they constructed this magnificent Tantric Buddhist mandala sandpainting.

The monks will spend up to eight hours a day working together on one of their sandpaintings. The process starts with an opening ceremony and the consecration of work site.

Each work begins as a drawing, the outline of the mandala. Then, colored sand is poured from traditional metal funnels called chak-purs. Each monk holds a chak-pur in one hand, while running a metal rod on its grated surface; the vibration causes the sands to flow like liquid.

Once the sandpainting has been completed it is ceremoniously destroyed using a ritual vajra.

"The sands are swept up and placed in an urn; to fulfill the function of healing, half is distributed to the audience at the closing ceremony, while the remainder is carried to a nearby body of water, where it is deposited. The waters then carry the healing blessing to the ocean, and from there it spreads throughout the world for planetary healing."

Click here to learn more about The Mystical Arts of Tibet

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